Chatbot: 3 Reasons Why You Should Invest in a Facebook Chatbot

chatbots and social shopping

Chatbot: 3 Reasons Why You Should Invest in a Facebook Chatbot

21st August 2018 by Roger Martin

Chatbot: 3 Reasons Why You Should Invest in a Facebook Chatbot

21st August 2018 by Roger Martin

Chatbot programmes are created to automatically interact with messages that they receive, but that barely touches the surface of their capabilities. From booking flights, buying shoes, wine, clothing, booking tickets for a concert and even ordering food, chatbots have enormous potential.

 

It was at the Facebook F8 conference in 2015 where Facebook unveiled the new Messenger feature as a way to improve business to customer communication. Four years on and now there are over 1.3 billion users on Messenger. It comes as no surprise that 2018 is predicted to be the year that more people use the Messenger app over Facebook itself.

Due to the increase in Messenger popularity, and users being 3.5x more likely to open a Messenger message over an email, brands need to be taking this platform seriously.

But what are the main reasons why you should be utilising one of the hottest digital trends of 2018?

1) 24/7 response 

 

On average, brands take around ten hours to respond to a message on social, however, customers expect to receive an answer within four. This six-hour gap could be the difference between a customer making a purchase with you or a customer going elsewhere. It’s physically impossible to reply to every message unless you have a dedicated 24/7 customer service team.  Thankfully, unlike us, the chatbot doesn’t need to sleep, allowing customers to receive a response on any day, at any time.

 

2) Broadcasting messages 

 

One of the biggest benefits of a Facebook chatbot is the ability to broadcast messages to people on your Messenger list. With the change in Facebook algorithms, not all of the people who like your Facebook page will see your posts, meaning that they could miss vital announcements. However, broadcasting messages such as company news, upcoming events, latest offers or even asking questions for market research purposes will go directly into a person’s inbox.

The result? Higher open rates and click-through rates compared to email. On top of this, Facebook Messenger inboxes are not as cluttered as email inboxes and therefore your customers are more likely to see your email. Lastly, people who use Facebook Messenger often have push notifications on, increasing the chances of your message being seen.

 
 

3) Speed up the product purchase process

 

Another reason the chatbot is a remarkable marketing tool is that it allows you to take the customer on a journey and suggest products or services suited to them. For instance, if someone is looking for running shoes, the chatbot can relay the top five most popular shoes instantly. It can also provide a direct link to shop, pick shoe size and add straight to basket. Reducing the number of steps a consumer takes to make a purchase is hugely beneficial and increases the likelihood of a sale.

It’s the future!

Chatbot-3-reasons-to invest

If you’re still unsure whether implementing a Facebook chatbot is the right thing for your business, know this: by 2020, it is estimated that 85% of customer-business relationships will be conducted without human interaction. It’s clear to see that chatbots will revolutionise the way brands communicate and market to their customers.

Are you ready to embrace the chatbot? Get in touch!

 

Social Media for Social Good

Social Media For Good

Social Media for Social Good

8th June 2018 by Roger Martin

Social Media for Social Good

8th June 2018 by Roger Martin

social good

With many consumers believing that companies should use their position to initiate positive social change, we recommend including your core values and corporate responsibility activities in your social media strategy to help connect with your audience and build brand loyalty.

Here are three ways brands have used social media for social good.

TOMS

TOMS work with non-profit organisations in over ten countries. Their ‘One for One’ promise has given 60 million pairs of shoes to children, and its Eyewear promise has resulted in over 400,000 people having their sight restored.

TOMS used Instagram to promote their One Day Without Shoes event, encouraging people to go barefoot for the day. For every photo posted with the hashtag, TOMS gave shoes to a child, with the aim of bringing the global Toms community together with a shared goal.

social good

M&S

M&S, the UK market leader in lingerie, are working with Breast Cancer Now with the aim of raising £13 million in five years to help prevent the disease.

Their Instagram account highlights this partnership by showcasing style bloggers and influencers wearing statement t-shirts – complete with shoppable links.

social good

Airbnb

Airbnb’s #weaccept campaign sought to celebrate diversity. It emphasised that ‘acceptance starts with all of us’, regardless of race, religion, age or gender.

The campaign supports their Open Homes initiative, where Airbnb work with refugee agencies to provide free temporary accommodation to refugees in seven countries.

social good

Our friendly team of digital marketers can help you come up with a social strategy that highlights your CSR endeavours. Contact us at info@star-digital.co.uk or on 01604 696385.

Social Media Fails – and How to Avoid Them!

Dove How Not to Market!

Social Media Fails – and How to Avoid Them!

21st May 2018 by Roger Martin

Social Media Fails – and How to Avoid Them!

21st May 2018 by Roger Martin

There are some fantastic social media campaigns out there. We love Asos’s on point copy and striking visual content:

social media fails

and Airbnb‘s inspirational, user-generated Instagram:

social media fails

However, big brands don’t always get it right. Check out these infamous examples of social media fails which have made us laugh, gasp and double check our own Hootsuite posting schedules.

1 Dove’s body wash ad caused controversy with its Facebook GIF version of the ad showing a black woman removing her top to reveal a white woman. The ad was removed and Dove apologised, but social media users called for a boycott of the brand due to the ad’s racist implications.

social media fails

Star tip: Check how your ads look on all channels. Do they work as well on Facebook as on YouTube, for example, or do they need repurposing? Do shortened versions tell the full story?

2 Pretty Little Thing wished a million of their Facebook customers a very happy new year. In October.

social media fails

Star tip: We’re all about scheduled posts making life easier for social media managers, but double check when you’ve actually scheduled them for.

3 Transport for London got all passive aggressive over on Twitter in its response to a fed up commuter’s complaint. Although some users found the response funny, TFL were accused of being arrogant and glib.

social media fails

Star tip: Twitter is a great tool for dealing with customer service queries. However, make sure you respond in a calm and professional manner.

4 Susan Boyle’s album launch announcement caused hilarity with its #susanalbumparty promotional hashtag. Whether accidental or deliberate, this is probably the most famous example of a hashtag fail.

social media fails

Star tip: Get someone not involved with your campaign to read any associated hashtags for sense and meaning.

5 McDonald’s knew they wanted to tweet, but weren’t too sure what they wanted to say.

social media fails

Star tip: Everyone makes mistakes, so own it – rather than simply deleting the post, find a way to use it to your advantage, as McDonalds did with their follow up tweet.

social media fails

6 Walkers Crisps campaign backfired magnificently when, rather than sending in selfies to be incorporated into an automated video, users sent in photos of infamous characters such as Fred West and Rolf Harris.

social media fails

Star tip: Campaigns using personalised content can engage your audience brilliantly, but make sure you run your ideas past someone else in the planning stages. Discuss what the pitfalls could be and where the plan could go wrong. It’s easy to get caught up in a great idea and not see how other people may hijack it.

Want some help with social media management? Call our friendly team on 01604 696385 to find out how we can help.